National Complete Streets Coalition

Streets are a vital part of livable, attractive communities. Everyone, regardless of age, ability, income, race, or ethnicity, ought to have safe, comfortable, and convenient access to community destinations and public places–whether walking, driving, bicycling, or taking public transportation. But too many of our streets are designed only for speeding cars or creeping traffic jams.

A Complete Streets approach integrates people and place in the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of our transportation networks. This helps to ensure streets are safe for people of all ages and abilities, balance the needs of different modes, and support local land uses, economies, cultures, and natural environments.

The National Complete Streets Coalition, which launched this movement in 2004, promotes the development and implementation of Complete Streets policies and professional practices. To date, over 1450 agencies at the local, regional, and state levels have adopted Complete Streets policies, totaling more than 1500 policies nationwide.

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Virtual engagement: A springboard for inclusive community planning


Although “business as usual” is not an option today for most local governments, many continue to move forward with important projects, finding new and innovative ways to engage the public in planning for smarter growth. The Form-Based Codes Institute (FBCI) is partnering with the National Charrette Institute (NCI) to host a webinar series featuring the tools, techniques, and equity implications of virtual community engagement.

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More than one million households without a car in rural America need better transit

Many people think the only Americans regularly relying on transit to reach jobs and services live in big cities. Yet the majority of counties with high rates of zero-car households are rural. In fact, more than one million households in predominantly rural counties do not have access to a vehicle. Rural Americans without cars face unique barriers and they deserve a tailored approach to their transit needs rather than just assuming they can or will drive everywhere.

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