Street Lights 2016

A Complete Streets approach can help people improve our health, our daily commutes, our local economies, and our communities. How can advocates encourage Complete Streets, and work with engineers and practitioners to get these projects built?

We convened to answer these questions on November 15, 2016 in Sacramento, CA at Street Lights: Illuminating Implementation and Equity in Complete Streets, our first-ever Complete Streets conference. This day-long conference offered a chance for transportation planners and engineers, community, equity, and health advocates, local officials, and Complete Streets practitioners to share ideas, brainstorm solutions, and celebrate the success of the Complete Streets movement nationwide.

Street Lights convened interactive panels and breakout discussions about cutting-edge Complete Streets ideas, practices, and tools. The conference came at an incredibly exciting time, as Congress recently included Complete Streets language in its new federal transportation law and the nation had just recently passed 1,000 Complete Streets policies.

Missed Street Lights? Read the full event recap, view the Flickr album, and check out the media recap.

Coalition Events

Read our blog to learn about the Coalition’s past and upcoming events >>

How can the change coming to suburbs be harnessed for good?

The notion of the suburbs is nestled deeply in the collective imagination in America, but as we wrote recently, “the suburbs of today aren’t necessarily the suburbs of yesteryear.” In a future that is increasingly urban, where suburbs are rapidly changing, what changes should they consider to stay prosperous and resilient? 

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This family takes a liking to biking

Chris Rall and his two twins pictured on a bike.
Our family is a biking family. For us, that means being healthy, active, and having a lot of freedom and mobility. Biking is how our family chooses to get around, but building a family-friendly city means having streets that can help people get around in any number of ways—walking, biking, transit, scooting, or driving.

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