Smart growth news – December 6

The future of cities? An unusual way of untangling gridlock
MSNBC, December 2, 2011
Janette Sadik-Khan is on a mission to tame New York’s mean streets. As transportation commissioner for New York City, she’s closed off half of Times Square to traffic and converted 260 miles of city streets into bike lanes. Her goal is to reduce the city’s carbon footprint and manage New York’s notorious traffic, while possibly creating a blueprint for other cities around the world.

Mayor’s goal: Bring 10,000 new families to city in a decade
Baltimore Sun, December 5, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake hopes to attract 10,000 families to Baltimore in the next decade — which would reverse more than a half-century of population decline — and would like to serve at least one more term beyond the one she begins Tuesday…”If Baltimore is to have a future, the leadership in the city has to focus on making the city a vibrant, growing city,” Rawlings-Blake said in an interview Monday. “If you’re not focused on growing it, you’re resigned to a slow death.”

Riverfront trail is a window to KC’s past
Kansas City Star, December 5, 2011
Kansas City’s Riverfront Heritage Trail has given residents their best chance to practically touch the Missouri River’s edge, at Berkley Park and other downtown destinations. Now, in its latest phases in the West Bottoms, the trail is providing residents with other powerful connections to the city’s history and heritage.

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Secretaries LaHood, Donovan on public transportation and connecting to jobs

Department of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan spoke at the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program and on today’s Huffington Post about a new report on how public transportation helps American workers connect to jobs.

“Missed Opportunity: Transit and Jobs in Metropolitan America,” is “a first-of-its-kind analysis that shows how transit systems link workers to jobs in metropolitan America.” The report emphasizes the importance of not just the location and frequency of transit service, but ultimately how well transit aligns with where people work and live. LaHood and Donovan explain that public transportation plays a crucial role in the American economy, and better coordination between federal agencies can yield even greater benefits from this important resource.

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