Join us for a conversation about innovative transportation services in DC and beyond

Capital Bikeshare
Capital Bikeshare is one of the many innovative transportation options now available in the DC area. Photo by James Schwartz via Flickr.

DC-area residents have more choices about how to get around today than ever before. Car sharing, bike sharing and ride sharing—and the apps that make these services possible—are revolutionizing transportation as we know it. DC is a hotbed of transportation innovation that the rest of the nation is watching.

Join transportation entrepreneurs for Transportation in the City, a discussion about new ways to get around and the future of transportation in Washington, DC and beyond. We’ll discuss what’s working and why, market and demographic trends that make these services succeed, the role of public policy in this field and how startup innovations are making a difference.

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DC's startup community and neighborhood advocates convene at Tech In The City

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How can startup companies in DC contribute to making great neighborhoods, and how can neighborhoods attract more startups?

In a panel discussion and reception hosted yesterday evening by Smart Growth America, ElevationDC and iStrategy Labs, Washington, DC’s emerging tech community convened with advocates for better urban development to discuss how startups are changing the city’s real estate, and how the city can support startups through better development strategies.

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Startup Places and the companies that call them home

Crossroads District
Baltimore Street in Kansas City, MO’s Crossroads District. Photo by Chris Murphy via Flickr.

This Thursday we’re hosting Tech in the City: Startup Communities in Startup Places, a conversation about DC’s startup companies and the neighborhoods they call home. Follow the conversation on Twitter later this week at #TechintheCity.

Small tech startups are coming together in cities across the country to build communities of innovation and collaboration. Why are these communities taking root in the places they do? And what can cities do to foster these leaders of the new economy?

It may seem counterintuitive for competing companies to move close to one another, but there are reasons for startups to work together. As Brad Feld explains in his book Startup Communities, startups can be more successful, create more jobs, and attract more talent by working together to create an inclusive community of people who gather together to share ideas.

Dozens of cities in the United States are now home to one or more startup communities. These clusters of companies are often grouped around a shared resource like co-working space, a tech accelerator or university. It takes more than that, though, for a startup community to flourish. In city after city these communities are forming in neighborhoods with a common set of characteristics.

I call these neighborhoods Startup Places. Whether in former industrial neighborhoods, a city’s downtown or an historic district put to innovative new use, Startup Places have places to gather, a dynamic mix of people nearby, and affordable commercial spaces. These neighborhood features meet the needs of startup communities by giving startup leaders places to meet fellow entrepreneurs, mingle with new ideas, and find flexible office space affordable enough for a new business. Here’s a closer look at how neighborhoods like these come about.

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