KC Streetcar: A demonstration of the possible


This month on Building Better Communities with Transit we’re joined by the Executive Director of the KC Streetcar Authority, Tom Gerend. In 2016, Kansas City, MO opened the first streetcar the city has seen in almost 60 years and transformed the city’s downtown. Former skeptics of the line are now some of the KC Streetcar’s biggest proponents as businesses have boomed and more people are moving to—and spending in—the center city. The 2.2 mile KC Streetcar, akin to a downtown circulator, is “a demonstration of the possible.”

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Transit on the agenda (and the ballot) in Nashville

a map of the proposed BRT routes, light rail lines, high-frequency bus corridors, and community transit centers on the Nashville ballot this May.On May 1, residents in Nashville will be voting on a $5.2 billion proposal to dramatically improve and expand the city’s transit system with improved frequency on existing lines, new BRT routes, and a new light rail system. Our upcoming conference, Intersections: Creating Culturally Complete Streets, is happening right in the midst of this once-in-a-generation conversation.

Complete Streets Transportation

President Trump talks infrastructure in State of the Union, but with few specifics

As expected, President Trump used his first State of the Union Address Tuesday night as an opportunity to discuss infrastructure. The speech was light on specifics, though the Washington Post and other outlets continue to report that the White House is preparing a full plan to be released in a few weeks.

Transportation

Contact your Representative TODAY to protect federal transit funding

Dedicated funding for public transit is in a fight for its life.

Late last night, the House of Representative’s Ways and Means Committee released their proposal for a federal surface transportation bill. The bill would eliminate dedicated funding for public transit and jeopardize these funds for years to come.

Speak out for transit: Send a messge to your Representative today.

Removing the guarantee on funding would mean that transit would have to compete each year for general fund revenues. As Congress looks for ways to slash federal funding, this change puts transit funding in danger of deep cuts in coming years.

Help fight this proposed bill: send a message to your Representative today.

Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle have supported dedicated transit funding as a way to relieve congestion and help workers reach jobs quickly, efficiently and affordably. As the American economy slowly recovers, demand for transit has been rising across the country – and now is not the time to jeopardize federal support for these programs.

Contacting your members of Congress is simple and only takes a few minutes. Help defend dedicated funding for transit: Click here to send a letter to your Representative.

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Upcoming Webinar: TIGER Grants and Rural America Part II

The U.S. Department of Transportation recently announced a new grant opportunity for rural communities across the country. The Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant program is a great opportunity for rural communities to leverage federal funds for local transportation projects. To help communities apply to these very competitive grants, the American Public Transportation Association, the National Association of Development Organizations, the National League of Cities, PolicyLink, Reconnecting America, Rural Assembly, Smart Growth America, and Transportation for America have joined together to encourage rural communities to submit superior applications for this funding.

If you plan to apply for this year’s round of TIGER grants or wish to learn more about the program and the application process, join us for a webinar on Wednesday, August 31, 2011 at 2:00 PM EDT. The webinar will build on the overview provided by our first webinar in this series, which took place earlier in August, by exploring in-depth the various aspects of the TIGER application process.

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Michigan communities overwhelmingly support public transit ballot measures

As municipalities across the country feel the crunch of tightening budgets, voters are choosing to prioritize public transportation at the ballot box. Transit agencies large and small are feeling enormous fiscal pressures and many are being forced to cut service, lay off workers, and, in some cases, stop operating altogether. According to the American Public Transportation Association, 84% of U.S. transit agencies are being forced to make these choices. However, in the great state of Michigan, voters are choosing to save local transit through property tax levies. Eleven communities held ballot elections on transit funding in 2011, and ten of these were approved.

A ballot measure (sometimes referred to as initiative, proposition, or referendum) is a form of direct democracy where voters decide to approve or reject a policy proposal that is presented on Election Day. The proposal could enact a new law, create or direct a funding source, change the local or state constitution, or even recall an elected leader. Each year, states bring dozens of ballot measures about transportation funding to a vote, particularly about public transit. Often these measures propose creating or renewing a source of funding by enacting a fee or tax, and they can include project lists and designate specific receiving jurisdictions or transit agencies. Transportation ballot measures tend to pass at twice the rate of funding measures for things like arts, education, and open space. According to the Center for Transportation Excellence, transit funding ballots have had a 70% approval rate over the last ten years. They win in both red and blue districts, indicating voters’ willingness to prioritize transportation choices in their communities.

A ballot measure (sometimes referred to as initiative, proposition, or referendum) is a form of direct democracy where voters decide to approve or reject a policy proposal that is presented on Election Day. The proposal could enact a new law, create or direct a funding source, change the local or state constitution, or even recall an elected leader. Each year, states bring dozens of ballot measures about transportation funding to a vote, particularly about public transit. Often these measures propose creating or renewing a source of funding by enacting a fee or tax, and they can include project lists and designate specific receiving jurisdictions or transit agencies. Transportation ballot measures tend to pass at twice the rate of funding measures for things like arts, education, and open space. According to the Center for Transportation Excellence, transit funding ballots have had a 70% approval rate over the last ten years. They win in both red and blue districts, indicating voters’ willingness to prioritize transportation choices in their communities.

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