How Massachusetts is encouraging communities to take action on Complete Streets

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation is taking action to encourage more Complete Streets projects across the state through its Complete Streets Funding Program. Last week, we hosted a webinar highlighting the program.

Complete Streets

Introducing Street Lights, our first-ever Complete Streets conference

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A Complete Streets approach can help Americans improve our health, our daily commutes, our local economies, and our communities. 

How can advocates encourage Complete Streets, and work with engineers and practitioners to get these projects built?

Join us to answer these questions at Street Lights: Illuminating Implementation and Equity in Complete Streets, the first-ever Complete Streets conference, taking place on November 15, 2016 in Sacramento, CA. 

We want you to join us. This day-long conference will be a chance for transportation planners and engineers, community, equity, and health advocates, local officials, and Complete Streets practitioners to share ideas, brainstorm solutions, and celebrate the success of the Complete Streets movement nationwide together.

Complete Streets

Webinar Presentation: Complete Streets Implementation and Design

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Complete Streets integrates people and place in the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of our transportation networks. Hundreds of communities across the country have already adopted Complete Streets policies—the next step is to implement them.

Last week the National Complete Streets Coalition held a webinar that offered transportation planners, engineers, and practitioners insights about turning policies on paper into changes on the ground. The webinar provided an overview of the Complete Streets planning-to-design process; how Complete Streets and active transportation are impacting communities’ health and economy; get tips on what to consider when starting a Complete Streets project; learn strategies for design retrofits; and hear case studies of places that have done it successfully.

Complete Streets

Upcoming webinar: Complete Streets Implementation and Design

Hundreds of communities across the country have adopted Complete Streets policies—the next step is to implement them. An upcoming webinar will help transportation planners and practitioners do just that.

Join the National Complete Streets Coalition for a free online discussion all about Complete Streets implementation and design on Thursday, April 28, 2016 from 12:00-1:00 PM EDT. The event is designed to help transportation planners, engineers, and practitioners turn policies on paper into changes on the ground. Join Emiko Atherton, Director of the National Complete Streets Coalition, and Mike Rutkowski, Coalition Steering Committee member, to learn how Complete Streets projects can help people and communities and what practitioners need to consider when designing and implementing those projects.

Complete Streets

FDOT’s new Complete Streets implementation plan will take policy into practice

On December 7, 2015, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) released its Complete Streets Implementation Plan, an ambitious and comprehensive commitment to change the way roads are designed and built in Florida to make them safer for all types of travelers, while also promoting economic development and enhancing quality of life.

Complete Streets

Change in plans

CA San Francisco Bus stop on Cesar Chavez credit Aaron Bialick Streetsblog SFA recent redesign of Cesar Chavez Street makes it better for people walking, bicycling, and taking transit and incorporates green infrastructure. Photo: Aaron Bialick, Streetsblog SF

This post is the second in a series of case studies about Complete Streets people, places, and projects. Follow the full series over the next several weeks.

In the late 1930s, the City of San Francisco had grand plans to build a third bridge across the San Francisco Bay. They designed a major arterial to lead to that bridge, but 80 years later those bridge dreams have never been realized—and the arterial was in sore need of an update.

Complete Streets

Indianapolis works to implement its strong Complete Streets policy with Smart Growth America workshop

indy-workshop-borderChallenges and opportunities on the whiteboard at a Complete Streets workshop in Indianapolis last week. Photo by the Indiana Complete Streets Coalition, via Twitter.

In 2012 the Indianapolis-Marion County City-County Council unanimously passed the Indianapolis Complete Streets ordinance, a policy intended to ensure that streets are designed, built, operated, and maintained to be safe and accessible for everyone, regardless of whether they travel by bus, bike, foot or personal vehicle. Indianapolis’ Complete Streets policy was the best in the nation that year, and remains one of the strongest city ordinances adopted to date.

Since the policy’s passage, Indianapolis staff and Health by Design partners have been working to ensure successful implementation of the policy and to monitor and track related performance measures. To help accelerate the move from policy to implementation, Smart Growth America’s National Complete Streets Coalition held a Complete Streets implementation workshop on June 10 and 11, 2015, as part of a free, grant-funded technical assistance program. The workshop provided additional tools, resources and guidance for policy implementation. It also offered an opportunity to communicate the benefits of Complete Streets and local project examples to the public.

Complete Streets Technical assistance

Get the recap: “Evaluating Complete Streets Projects: A guide for practitioners” webinar and discussion

On Tuesday, the National Complete Streets Coalition hosted a webinar on our newest resource, Evaluating Complete Streets Projects: A guide for practitioners. The new guide is designed to help transportation professionals understand and use new measures of success, and provides an introduction to performance measurement for Complete Streets projects. The recording of Tuesday’s webinar is now available.

Complete Streets

Register for today's webinar on "Evaluating Complete Streets Projects"

Communities have seen amazing results from their Complete Streets projects. These projects have made streets safer, increased the number of people biking, walking, and taking transit, and have been related to broader economic gains. But too few communities measure these results.

Complete Streets

The benefits of Complete Streets — and how to measure them

The National Complete Streets Coalition is coming out with two new resources detailing the benefits of Complete Streets projects, and how to measure them.

Safer Streets,
Stronger Economies

Coming out March 24, 2015
1 PM EDT

How well do Complete Streets projects achieve transportation goals like safety and throughput? How do they support broader economic efforts? This new research looks at data from dozens of Complete Streets projects from across the country to compare the outcomes communities get from their investments. Join the online kickoff discussion to hear about the success some cities have had with Complete Streets.

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Evaluating Complete Streets Projects

Coming out March 31, 2015
1 PM EDT

A Complete Streets approach connects community goals to transportation investments, and measuring the performance of these projects can help communicate that connection. This introductory guide will provide an overview of how to evaluate Complete Streets projects, including the measures and metrics most useful to common goals, and a handy list of resources for more in-depth application. 

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Complete Streets